For years and years, one of the main arguments proposed in favour of using learning technologies has been: “It scales!” Whether there are ten, a hundred or a thousand students in your class, it doesn’t matter. We used this argument in the early days, when developing adaptive on-line courses for students at the University of Education in Freiburg. And yes, we had a couple of hundred students every year. We used the very same argument when designing courses in software engineering at Fraunhofer IESE. And yes, at lot of learners came.

There are lots of examples, where learning was brought in based on the promise that you could reach a large audience in an easy way. But I always felt that e-Learning had never really delivered on this promise. A course for a couple of hundred students. Good. A training solution for several thousand employees in a company.  Nice. But only recently, we have seen examples of real scale. More than 100,000 people registered for a free on-line course on Artificial Intelligence offered by Stanford University. And 25,000 of them actually finished. Yes, that’s 25,000 people completing a hard, technical university course! Based on this success they have now started Udacity, a growing set of on-line lectures (all of them in Computer Science so far).

1 million learnersThe phenomenon has been coined Massive Open Online Courses, MOOC, by George Siemens back in 2008 (see interview). Only now, it really gets massive. Similar offers are available from academic room and the by now well known MITx.

But we don’t even have to look that for to see the emerging trend. My esteemed colleague Eugene just celebrated the 1,000,000th view on his YouTube channel Learn with Dr Eugene O’Loughlin. The first million is always the hardest, but I am confident we will all soon be millionaires.

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